Radio is Killing Music

Wednesday, December 13, 2006 at 2:02 PM
Tags: 2, XM
  • February 5, 1996 - New York City loses country music when WYNY changes formats (it was resurrected as Y-107 in the surrounding areas, only to be killed off again on May 7, 2002).
  • May 11, 2005 - San Francisco loses country music when KZBR changes formats. 
  • June 3, 2005 - New York's WCBS-FM, an oldies-based station for over three decades, abruptly switches to the Jack FM format. No more oldies on New York's FM dial.
  • On the same day - WJMK in Chicago also switches to Jack FM, leaving no oldies for Chicago either. 
  • August 17, 2006 - Los Angeles' KZLA switches formats to Adult Contemporary, leaving L.A. with no country music stations.
  • December, 2006 - Washington D.C.'s 60-year-old classical music station, WGMS, is set to be acquired and turned into a Redskins based sports-talk format station - marking the end of classical music in the Washington D.C. area.

It's an ongoing theme that we're seeing over and over again. Regular radio continues to kill off music genres one at a time, leaving those areas devoid of any way of discovering new music. Commercial classical music stations have dropped from 40 stations in 1998, to only 27 - nationwide - a number that goes from surprising, to really surprising.

WGMS even was to start multicasting in HD Radio (terrestrial radio's supposed technological savior), adding two more classical music stations to the area. Sorry, not anymore.

"But we have iPods."

Sure, iPods are great. They're the perfect way to carry your entire music collection with you. Simple, easy, convenient. But Apple only sells around 20 iTunes per iPod. Twenty. This means that the music on most people's iPods is their own (old) collection (or it's unpaid "borrowed" music that we can't prove). And what's the most popular way that people discover new music? It's through radio.

XM Classical Music AdXM Satellite Radio has been quick to respond.

When country music left L.A., XM stepped in as the sponsor to L.A.'s Country Bash. Now they're aggressively running an ad in the Washington Post, advertising XM's three classical music channels. (Check out the ad after the jump.) XM specifically highlights the fact that D.C.'s acclaimed hosts Martin Goldsmith, Robert Aubry Davis and Paul Bachmann (all formally from WETA) are part of these channels.

Terrestrial radio will continue to complain to the FCC, demanding that satellite radio be regulated by the same rules. The RIAA will gladly file suit against XM, because they need to "fairly compensate labels, artists, songwriters and publishers." SoundExchange will ridiculously demand a massive increase in royalities from XM and Sirius in order to broadcast the music that their terrestrial counterparts continue to cast aside. These are companies who represent the music industry as a whole.

Does anyone see something drastically wrong with this picture?

In the very near future, and even currently, the only way to discover and hear certain types of music will be on the Internet, and on Satellite Radio. Fact: the satellite radio industry is the single largest contributor of sound recording performance royalties to artists and record labels. So while terrestrial radio is killing music, satellite radio is in essence, keeping it alive.

View XM's ad in The Washington Post after the jump...

XM Classical Music Ad

TrackBack/Ping:

Comments

They need to change their slogan to WAY BEYOND AM & FM, XM Satellite Radio.

febuary 25th 2003 Modern rock station y100 gets blown up for hip-hop as 100.3 the beat last song played was pearljams alive

Surprise!

Clear channel radio is terrible, and spreads monotony like cancer. Were these stations locally owned before, or by Clear Channel?

the riaa is also trying to shrink the rates ,it currently pays to the publisher and artist.they the riaa want to be paid more from sirius/xm along with other digital services.While passing on less to the real owner of the material....

what a racket and uncle sam, lets em continue the game,soundexchange has has 7,500 artist they cant locate in order to pay.effective 12/16/06 the artist will lose those funds.

I think it's great that XM does things like this. Obviously it's a great reason to make the jump to satellite radio... advertise to a market that's about to lose, or has already lost, the last station playing a format of music.

Remember last year's (I think it was last year's) CMA's in NYC? Remember that XM put one of its Country channels on a public radio station for several days during the awards? Ya can't do more for a music genre than TAKE OVER A PUBLIC RADIO STATION to put a format of music on the air for a limited amount of time when every other radio station in that area has shunned that format.

The RIAA and terrestrial radio can complain all they want about satellite radio, the royalties they pay, and whatever else they want, but you're right: XM and Sirius are both keeping music alive.

>>>febuary 25th 2003 Modern rock station y100 gets blown up for hip-hop as 100.3 the beat last song played was pearljams alive

And it all started because those morning jocks wanted a pay raise and Radio One said NO. They are finally number 1 or number 2 in the market though. What I find really funny about their show (When I have heard it) is they are doing Bubba's bits only a little more gay. And I heard that Bubba sucks from a lot of people. Hmmm shot gun beer in a puss or poor liquor in a guys a$$.

Content has taken a back seat to advertising dollars.

I had the misfortune of forgetting my XM a few weeks back during my shift on the road. For eight hours I was forced to listen to the local stations. Most of the music stations played three songs, played 9 minutes of commercials, and repeated the process over and over and over again. I'd even hear the same commercials repeated within the same 9 minute "block" of ads.

Talk radio has even met the demand for filling time with ads. I tried to listen to a late morning show I once was a fan of several years ago, "pre-sat-radio", and the host covered less topics than he once did and had to repeat himself constantly because of the constant intrusion of commercials.

Content has almost completely disappeared from terrestrial radio. In another 6 years the only thing worth listening to on the radio will be town hall meetings broadcast on shortwave from New Brunswick.

Content has taken a back seat to advertising dollars.

I had the misfortune of forgetting my XM a few weeks back during my shift on the road. For eight hours I was forced to listen to the local stations. Most of the music stations played three songs, played 9 minutes of commercials, and repeated the process over and over and over again. I'd even hear the same commercials repeated within the same 9 minute "block" of ads.

Talk radio has even met the demand for filling time with ads. I tried to listen to a late morning show I once was a fan of several years ago, "pre-sat-radio", and the host covered less topics than he once did and had to repeat himself constantly because of the constant intrusion of commercials.

Content has almost completely disappeared from terrestrial radio. In another 6 years the only thing worth listening to on the radio will be town hall meetings broadcast on shortwave from New Brunswick.

Post a comment

(or continue the conversation in the Orbitcast Forums)


Recent Entries

From the Forums...
Search Orbitcast:

Recent Readers
Latest Poll
Technology & Media Blogs
These are blogs that relate to technology, media or other specific industries, but not soley on satrad.
Sponsored Links





Copyright © 2008 Orbitcast Media, LLC.